Summer storm, Grand Canyon

Mather Point summer storm.

Mather Point summer storm.

 

The first time I visited the south rim of Grand Canyon, weather was grey and wet. As I checked into a nearby hotel, a summer-storm approached with thunder and lightning. After a quick meal I drove to Mather Point and was totally awestruck by the vastness of this magnificent place. It is true as they say, absolutely nothing can prepare you for Grand Canyon! I walked back and forth between Mather and Yavapai points, searching for a good composition. A light rain in the air blurred out some of the canyon as the storm over north rim faded away. I got a few ok shots, but the conditions were difficult. However, as sunset closed in, a crack in the skies allowed for some direct sunlight in the canyon and a rainbow appeared for a few minutes in the tail-end of the storm. My position wasn’t ideal but I kept running back and forth and photographed frantically. When I came back to the hotel I had over 100 shots, which is very much for me in a little over an hour. When I later started to process them I was somewhat disappointed as most of them were grey and dull, and they have been hidden on one of my hard-drives until now. I sat down and started to process a few of them the other day, and managed to bring forward some of the magic I felt that late june afternoon last year. The image on the top is a composite of several shots, to compensate for the difficult light-conditions and bring forwards the details in my experience.To capture the lightning I used a ND-filter to allow a thirty seconds exposure and increase the chances of getting at least one lightning. However, in this long exposure, the rainbow totally disappeared, so I had to blend 3 images together to make room for the complete experience; One for the sky with the rainbow, one for the canyon and one for the sky with the lightning.

This next image is a single exposure from a slightly different position, allowing a little more foreground. To convey the vastness of Grand Canyon, I included a few people. I don’t know if you can see them, but they are tiny, dots on the mid-portion of the nearby left hand rim. Far below, around 1000m down, you can barely spot a small section of the Colorado River in the lower right corner.

Rainbow, Mather Point.

Rainbow, Mather Point.

 

The last image was captured at Yavapai Point the next morning. I arrived there in pitch darkness an hour before sunrise. I enjoyed the solitude and silence and captured a few images of the starlit canyon. As sunrise closed in, busloads of people arrived, and in a few minutes, thousands of people roamed the brim to see the sunrise. Ten minutes later, I was all by myself again. The world is a strange place.

Sunrise at Yavapai point

 

 

Hope you like my work, feel free to send me a note, visit my online-gallery or follow me on instagram, G+, Facebook or 500px. I wish you all a Merry Christmas and a happy and prosperous New Year!

Exposure blending

Christmas crescent

Christmas crescent

 

 

This image was captured on last christmas eve while visiting friends and family in North Norway. Long story short: On our way to christmas dinner, the light was wonderful, the moon emerged and the icy cold temperatures froze the shores and gave a dense fog over the sea. I couldn’t help myself. I changed outfit and ran down to the shore and worked there all the way into pitch darkness and well into christmas dinner. My very kind and understanding wife actually approved this stunt, but I got a suspicion that not everybody else was very happy… But at least I got a few nice images! 🙂

When I started to photograph, it was rather dark but the disappearing aurora of the sun lit up the scene in a wonderful red-pinkish hue. As it got darker and darker, the aurora weakened and stars started to appear. At the same time, the foreground was becoming very very dark (I could hardly see my hands..), and the moon very bright compared to the landscape. I knew that even the very high dynamic range sensor in my d800 would not be able to capture both landscape, moon, stars and the color of the disappearing sun in one single exposure. So, I composed this image with the camera on my tripod and took numerous exposures at different iso’s and exposure times to capture all the elements in the scene as I saw it. The next day, I sat down and inspected all the different files. The aurora and the moon matched perfectly in  some of the exposures, and to my surprise, earthshine lit up the shadowed part of the moon perfectly. The foreground however, was too dark on these exposures and the sky too bright to show any stars. My original plan was to follow my regular HDR workflow and blend the exposures in HDR efex pro but the result was far from satisfying. It lacked the contrast and crispness I wanted. I tried to increase clarity and contrast but by then things started to look really weird. Since I had three exposures from three different regions of the scene I decided to blend them manually. I used the image where the moon and the sunglow was perfect as my base. I then took one exposure of the starry sky and blended it into the top of the first image using the masking bug in the layers module of the wonderful OnOne Perfect Photo Suite 9. In exactly the same manner, I blended a lighter foreground exposure into the lower part of the image. The resulting image was then imported back into Lightroom and after slight adjustment of temperature, color, clarity and sharpness, the image came out very close to how I experienced the scene. The masking bug has a gradient which give soft and natural transitions and I found it amazing how naturally the different exposures blended with a broad gradient.

Hope you like my image, have a splendid weekend!

Dag Ole

 

“Winterscapes”

EAC_7828-Edit

 

As much as I love a day on the beach, I must admit that few things can compare to a photo-session in a freezing cold, snow-clad landscape. I’m fortunate enough to live in Norway so winter is all around me this time of year. Days are short, but when the skies are clear, the light is beautiful. This image was captured in late december near Mayavatn in central Norway. I was driving home from a visit to friends and family up north as I passed this scene. I stopped the car, parked and ran out in the snowy fields, having snow up to my waist. The thermometer showed -24 deg celsius and I was dressed for driving in a warm comfortable car, not fieldwork. Suffice to say, I got cold and wet, but I think it was worth it. Hope you like my image, have a super Wednesday!

Personal favorites of 2014 #1

top12-2014

 

“Twelve significant photographs in any one year is a good crop”     Ansel Adams

As this year is coming to an end, it is time to recapitulate and summarize 2014. We are all getting older, but as a friend of mine often says, it is better than the alternative. A few more wrinkles but many experiences richer. For me, this has been a great year with so much joy, happiness and love. I am a very fortunate guy!

Photographically, 2014 has also been pretty good. I have had the fortune of visiting amazing locations such as Venice, California, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, Bavaria and the German and Austrian Alps, Thailand and numerous places in Norway and the other Nordic countries. Furthermore, I have been pretty lucky in a few photographic competitions with gold medal in Trierenberg Supercircuit special themes, a gold and a silver medal in PX3, bronze medals in Epson Pano Awards, several honorable mentions in International Photography Awards, a 3rd place in B&W Spider awards etc. It is not easy to rank these, but at least what surprised me the most was the silver medal in the professional press/travel section of Prix de la Photographie Paris for my Tuscany-portfolio. However, the most important thing is that I have made a few images that I am happy with this year, and my plan is to present them one after one in single postings in the next days with a little story around how it was captured. As any photographer knows, picking personal favorites is a difficult task. My choices are very personal, and of course influenced by my connection to the subject matter, what happened before and after the capture and tons of other personal stuff. But hey, that’s the way it is! 🙂 BTW, these images come in random order. Picking some images are difficult enough and ranking them… well that’s impossible for me.

Enough talk. The first of my personal favorites from 2014 is this one:

 

The first summer night

 

 

In the end of august 2013 I made an image I titled “the last summer night”. When the summer of 2014 emerged I planned to make a similar image titled “the first summer night”. I used the last days of may to scout locations and plan this shot. When june 1st approached, the weather was perfect, the subject matter was just as I had imagined and the moon was in the right place. I got exactly what I hoped for, and thus, this is one of my favorites from 2014. Hope you like it too, stay tuned for more!

 

Dag Ole

To publish or not to publish…?

Watchtower and Virgin, evening glow

The Watchman and the Virgin river. Zion Natinal Park, Utah, June 2014.

 

…thats the question!

The American Southwest is a landscapephotographer’s paradise. Beautiful dramatic land with high mountain peaks, deep valleys and narrow canyons. The wonderful red-orange hue of the sandstone and a beautiful light just adds to the perfection. And it is very accessible! As a photographer, could you ask for more? Yes – that you are the first person to capture this! The only problem as I see it, is that the Southwest has been thoroughly photographed, to say the least. Of course, some places more that others…

Zion National Park in Utah is truly beautiful – and very popular among photographers. The landscape on my image above is arguably the most photographed scene in Zion. Therefore, as I planned my trip to Utah, I was determined NOT to photograph this exact scene, as it has been done so many times before by excellent photographers that it has unfortunately turned into more of a clichĂ©. Every day I spent in Zion, I passed this location several times, and I could not help but to study it and be mesmerised by the beauty of the scene. On my last day there, I finally gave in and had to stop and make this capture. Ok, so thousands of other images very like this one exist, but so what? This one too shows the beauty of this wonderful place, and what the image lacks in originality it compensates for in scenic beauty – or? The question is, should I use it in my portfolio of fine-art prints as it is not very original? Hmm- still thinking about it.

Feel free to comment and let me know what you think!

Dag Ole